Timeshare Cancellation Client Review Testimonial

       TIMESHARE CANCELLATION IN 6 WEEKS!

If you are looking for a trusted Timeshare Advocacy Company with proven results – you’ve come to the right place! Started in 2012 TimeshareReleaseNOW.com is the leading Timeshare Advocacy Team performing 100% Guaranteed Timeshare Cancellation & Money Recovery Services, however if you think that you deserve your money back, we do to! We have saved thousands of families financially, and you could be our next success story, we are Timeshare Release NOW! Not resellers, we are Timeshare cancellers and Timeshare Release NOW has your back! Our Certified Advocacy Team has an impeccable reputation and with over 10+ years in the business. Experience Timeshare Cancellation with the #1 Timeshare Exit Company on the East Coast.  Contact Jennifer Rogers to schedule a Free-Consultation to find out what Timeshare Cancellation program works for you. Learn How to Cancel a Timeshare in 8 weeks or less! Toll-Free (844)-215-2744

   Contact Media:                                                                                                                   

Jennifer Rogers

Marketing/PR Rep.

Marketing@TimeshareReleaseNow.com 

Tel: (207)-457-0209

 

Timeshare Release Now contract Relief services

A Credit Freeze, also known as a Security Freeze, is a way for you to have maximum control over access to your credit.

Placing a freeze on your credit report will prevent lenders and others from accessing your TransUnion credit report in response to a new credit application. With a security freeze in place, even you will need to take special steps when you wish to apply for any type of credit.

You will need to place a security freeze separately with each of the three major credit reporting companies if you want the freeze on all of your credit files. There may be a fee for this service based on state law; see our chart below for further details. A security freeze remains on your credit file until you remove it or choose to lift it temporarily when applying for credit or credit-dependent services.

When should I consider a security freeze?

  • You want maximum control over access to your credit report.
  • You are concerned that you might become a victim of fraud/ID theft.
  • You are a victim of fraud/ID theft.
  • You won’t need to apply for credit in the foreseeable future.
  • You are the guardian of a minor or medically incapacitated consumer who won’t need to apply for credit in the foreseeable future.

A freeze is a drastic solution, but can prevent a credit report from being released in response to a new credit application, so you will need to plan ahead and lift the freeze before applying for new credit.

fraud alert is a good alternative for many consumers. It directs the credit report recipient to contact the consumer at a number the consumer provides before granting credit.

How do I set up a security freeze?
To set up a security freeze with TransUnion, please visit our online form. You should be prepared with the following types of information:

  • Your full name, including middle initial and suffix, such as Jr., Sr. II, III
  • Social Security Number
  • Date of birth
  • Current address
  • All addresses where you have lived during the past two years
  • Email address
  • A copy of a government-issued identification card, such as a driver’s license or state ID card, etc.
  • A copy of a utility bill, bank or insurance statement, etc.

Lifting a Security Freeze

If you wish to temporarily lift your Security Freeze, go online: It’s the fastest, easiest way to accomplish your goal right now.

By Telephone:

Call 888-909-8872 or (844)-215-2744 if you wish to temporarily lift your Security Freeze. Our interactive voice response system will guide you through the process. Please have ready your Social Security number, date of birth, Security Freeze PIN, lift type, start and end dates and the payment method to be used to pay the applicable fee, if any, for the service. Please refer to the Security Freeze Table for fees, if any. Under certain circumstances, as defined by state law, you may be eligible for reduced fee or free Security Freeze services. Please note that it may take up to 15 minutes to process your request. It may take longer if you have lost your Security Freeze PIN.

By Mail:

Complete the Lift section of the Security Freeze Form that was sent to you with the Security Freeze information letter (sent to you after you requested the Security Freeze), and mail it to the address shown at the bottom of the form. Please refer to the Security Freeze Table for fees (if any). Under certain circumstances, as defined by state law, you may be eligible for reduced fee or free Security Freeze services. Acceptable forms of payment are check, money order, or credit card (American Express, Discover, MasterCard and Visa). When selecting the start date for your temporary lift, be sure to allow mail delivery time for your request to reach TransUnion. It may take up to three business days from date of receipt to process your request to temporarily lift the Security Freeze by mail. It may take longer if you have lost the Security Freeze PIN.

 

Security Freeze Fees by State

While some states may be more restrictive or prescriptive, TransUnion has made certain business decisions that may make it easier or less expensive for certain consumers to place, lift or remove security freezes. These decisions are noted below:

  • TransUnion will allow any consumer in any state to add, lift or remove a security freeze.
  • TransUnion allows consumers in any state to add, lift or remove a freeze online, by phone or by mail. Victims of ID Theft should submit their request, along with acceptable documentation, to TU via mail.
  • TransUnion does not charge victims of identity theft who want to add or lift a security freeze.
  • TransUnion does not charge any consumer for security freeze removals.
  • When a state allows for different amounts to be charged for a lift for a specific party versus a lift for a period of time, TransUnion will charge the lesser of these amounts for either type of lift.
  • TransUnion does not currently charge a consumer for replacement passwords or personally identifiable numbers (PIN).

In order to be eligible for free security freeze services, you may be required to provide proof of eligibility by mail. Click here for more information.

 

State Consumer Class Fees
Add Lift Remove
AA,AP and AE addresses

(Armed Forces)*

Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $10 $10 Free
Alabama Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $10 $10 Free
Consumer 65 years of age or older Free $10 Free
Alaska Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $5 $2 Free
Arizona Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $5 $5 Free
Protected Consumer—Victim of ID Theft Free N/A Free
Protected Consumer—not a victim of ID Theft $5 N/A Free
Protected Consumer—under the age of 16 years and the CRA has a credit report pertaining to the protected consumer Free N/A Free
Arkansas Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $5 $5 Free
Consumer is 65 years of age or older Free $5 Free
California Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $10 $10 Free
Consumer is 65 years of age or older Free $5 Free
Colorado Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft Free $10 Free
Connecticut Victim of ID Theft

Spouse of ID Theft Victim

Consumer on ID Theft Victim’s health insurance policy

Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $10 $10 Free
Victim of Domestic Violence Free Free Free
Consumer is 62 years of age or older Free Free Free
Protected Consumer—Victim of ID Theft Free N/A Free
Protected Consumer—not a victim of ID Theft $10 N/A Free
Delaware Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $10 Free Free
Consumer is 65 years of age or older $5 Free Free
Protected Consumer—Victim of ID Theft Free N/A Free
Protected Consumer—under the age of 16 years and the CRA has a credit report pertaining to the protected consumer Free N/A Free
Protected Consumer—not a victim of ID Theft $5 N/A Free
District of Columbia Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $10 Free Free
Florida Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $10 $10 Free
Consumer is 65 years of age or older Free $10 Free
Protected Consumer—Victim of ID Theft Free N/A Free
Protected Consumer—not a victim of ID Theft $10 N/A Free
Georgia Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $3 $3 Free
Consumer is 65 years of age or older Free $3 Free
Protected Consumer—Victim of ID Theft Free N/A Free
Protected Consumer—not a victim of ID Theft $10 N/A Free
Protected Consumer—under the age of 16 years and the CRA has a credit report pertaining to the protected consumer Free N/A Free
Guam * Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $10 $10 Free
Hawaii Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $5 $5 Free
Idaho Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $6 $6 Free
Illinois Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $10 $10 Free
Consumer is 65 years of age or older Free $10 Free
Active duty military member Free Free Free
Protected Consumer—not a victim of ID Theft $10 N/A Free
Protected Consumer—Victim of ID Theft Free N/A Free
Indiana Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Protected Consumer—not a victim of ID Theft $5 N/A Free
Protected Consumer—Victim of ID Theft Free N/A Free
Protected Consumer—under the age of 16 years and the CRA has a credit report pertaining to the protected consumer Free N/A Free
Iowa Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $10 $12 Free
Protected Consumer—Victim of ID Theft Free N/A Free
Protected Consumer—not a victim of ID Theft $5 N/A Free
Protected Consumer—under the age of 16 years and the CRA has a credit report pertaining to the protected consumer Free N/A Free
Kansas Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $5 $5 Free
Kentucky

(expires after seven years)

Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $10 $10 Free
Louisiana Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $10 $8 Free
Consumer is 62 years of age or older Free Free Free
Protected Consumer—Victim of ID Theft Free N/A Free
Protected Consumer—not a victim of ID Theft $10 N/A Free
Protected Consumer—under the age of 16 years and the CRA has a credit report pertaining to the protected consumer Free N/A Free
Maine Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Protected Consumer—Victim of ID Theft Free N/A Free
Protected Consumer—not a victim of ID Theft $10 N/A Free
Protected Consumer receives a notice of a security breach and provides a copy of that notice to the CRA Free N/A Free
Protected Consumer—under the age of 16 and the CRA has a credit report pertaining to the protected consumer Free N/A Free
Maryland Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $5 $5 Free
Protected Consumer—Victim of ID Theft Free N/A Free
Protected Consumer—not a victim of ID Theft $5 N/A Free
Protected Consumer- under the age of 16 and the CRA has a credit report pertaining to the protected consumer Free N/A Free
Massachusetts Victim of ID Theft

Spouse of ID Theft Victim

Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $5 $5 Free
Michigan Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $10 $10 Free
Protected Consumer—Victim of ID Theft Free N/A Free
Protected Consumer—not a victim of ID Theft $10 N/A Free
Protected Consumer—under the age of 16 and the CRA has a consumer report pertaining to the protected consumer Free N/A Free
Minnesota Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $5 $5 Free
Mississippi Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $10 Free Free
Missouri Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $5 $5 Free
Montana Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $3 $3 Free
Nebraska Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $3 $3 Free
Consumer is under the age of 19 Free N/A Free
Nevada Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $10 $10 Free
Consumer is 65 years of age or older Free Free Free
New Hampshire Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $10 $10 Free
New Jersey Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft Free $5 Free
New Mexico Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $10 Free Free
Consumer is 65 years of age or older Free Free Free
New York Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft Free $5 Free
Victim of Domestic Violence Free Free Free
Protected Consumer—Victim of ID Theft Free N/A Free
Protected Consumer—not a victim of ID Theft $15 N/A Free
North Carolina Victim of ID Theft

Spouse of ID Theft Victim

Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Consumer is 62 years of age or older Free Free Free
Protected Consumer—not a Victim of ID Theft $5 N/A Free
Protected Consumer—Victim of ID Theft Free N/A Free
North Dakota Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $5 $5 Free
Ohio Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $5 $5 Free
Oklahoma Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $10 $10 Free
Consumer is 65 years of age or older Free $10 Free
Oregon Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $10 $10 Free
Protected Consumer-—not a victim of ID Theft $10 N/A Free
Protected Consumer—Victim of ID Theft Free N/A Free
Pennsylvania

(expires after seven years)

Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $10 $10 Free
Consumer is 65 years of age or older Free $10 Free
Puerto Rico Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $10 $10 Free
Consumer is 65 years of age or older Free Free Free
Rhode Island Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $10 $10 Free
Consumer is 65 years of age or older Free Free Free
South Carolina Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Protected Consumer Free N/A Free
South Dakota

(expires after seven years)

Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $10 $10 Free
Protected Consumer—Victim of ID Theft Free N/A Free
Protected Consumer—not a victim of ID Theft $5 N/A Free
Tennessee Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $7.50 Free Free
Protected Consumer—not a victim of ID Theft $10 N/A Free
Protected Consumer—Victim of ID Theft Free N/A Free
Protected Consumer—under the age of 16 years and the CRA has a credit report pertaining to the protected consumer Free N/A Free
Texas Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $10 $10 Free
Protected Consumer—Victim of ID Theft Free N/A Free
Protected Consumer—not a victim of ID Theft $10 N/A Free
Utah Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $10 $10 Free
Protected Consumer—Victim of ID Theft Free N/A Free
Protected Consumer—not a victim of ID Theft $5 N/A Free
Protected Consumer—under the age of 16 years and the CRA has a credit report pertaining to the protected consumer Free N/A Free
Vermont Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $10 Free Free
Virgin Islands * Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $10 $10 Free
Virginia Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $10 Free Free
Protected Consumer—Victim of ID Theft Free N/A Free
Protected Consumer-—not a victim of ID Theft $10 N/A Free
Protected Consumer—under the age of 16 and the CRA has a credit report pertaining to the protected consumer Free N/A Free
Washington Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $10 $10 Free
Consumer is 65 years of age or older Free Free Free
West Virginia Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $5 $5 Free
Wisconsin Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $10 $10 Free
Protected Consumer—medically incapacitated and not a victim of ID Theft $10 N/A Free
Protected Consumer—Victim of ID Theft Free N/A Free
Protected Consumer—under the age of 16 and the CRA has a credit report pertaining to the protected consumer Free N/A Free
Wyoming Victim of ID Theft Free Free Free
Not a victim of ID Theft $10 $10 Free

*These states have not passed a security freeze law and will be processed in accordance to the default fee schedule.

 

 

Convenient Online Services

  • TransUnion Credit Report

Purchase your TransUnion Credit Report Online

  • Place a Fraud Alert

Help protect yourself from fraud or identity theft with a Fraud Alert

  • Place a Security Freeze

Control third party access to your credit with a Security Freeze

  • File or Check Status of a Dispute

Investigate potential inaccuracies on your credit report is easy. File a Dispute now

Timeshare Cancellations Program Photo

Fraud Prevention

Learn how to protect yourself from the outside world.

Get started now

There are a growing number of fraudulent Timeshare CancellationExit companies that steal money and identities from victimized Timeshare Owners worldwide. The existence of such companies also undermines the reputation of TimeshareReleaseNOW.com 100% Guaranteed Timeshare Exit services.

For the safest transaction, we encourage you to only use TimeshareReleaseNOW.com, a fully licensed and bonded Timeshare cancellation company. If you choose to use any other Advocacy service, the information on these pages may still help you to avoid becoming another victim.

Here are a couple of points to keep in mind while using TimeshareReleaseNOW.com:

Fully licensed and Bonded Timeshare Cancellation Company

TimeshareReleaseNOW.com is a licensed and bonded Timeshare Cancellation Company that helps buyers who want out outside of their legal rescission periods due to Fraud & Misrepresentation. The Timeshare Cancellation Company involved in this transaction is not only neutral; it is rated the #1 chosen Timeshare Exit Company in the US. Furthermore, being a government regulated entity, we are dedicated to protecting our clients from the unfair practices of timeshare companies.

However, TimeshareReleaseNOW.com does more than just educate our clients and cancel their Timeshares, we are also able to recover some if not all of the monies paid into the Timeshare Developer. We also monitor the client’s credit to ensure that the Timeshare does not affect the FICO credit scores. Once the legal retainer fees have been paid to start your case TimeshareReleaseNOW.com, the cancellation company will be immediately notifying the client that he or she has 2-4 business days to send us their testimony/statements and copies of deed and anything they think will help their case. If the item is not shipped within the four days, the client will risk losing the initial fee paid to company. TimeshareReleaseNOW.com requires that the client send in all required information prior to the Case Managers mailing out any of the legal documentation to cancel the Timeshare. If you are sending anything we recommend sending it Certified with Return Receipt to ensure that the documents are received by the appropriate receiver. Once we receive the requested documents, we will mail the client their “New Client Packet” in the mail within the first 5-7 business days.

Further, we provide a 24/7 support system to address all grievances from the clients throughout the whole process and uses arbitration to solve any issues that may arise. TimeshareReleaseNOW.com arbitration process is a simple, two-step process. In the cases of a dispute between both parties, the client and the company Timeshare Release Now, LLC the parties notify TimeshareReleaseNOW.com at which time a “Dispute Date” is immediately set. At that point, the parties have a fourteen day negation period to come to an agreement. If no agreement is made, TimeshareReleaseNOW.com is again notified and another fourteen day period, known as the “Arbitration Commencement Period” begins. In this step, the dispute may be forwarded and settled by the American Arbitration Association or Judicial and Mediation Services, Inc.

We are not affiliated with other Cancellation sites

TimeshareReleaseNOW.com and its subsidiaries only perform Timeshare Relief services at TimeshareReleaseNOW.com. Any other Timeshare Exit site that claims to be affiliated with TimeshareReleaseNOW.com is making a fraudulent claim. We do not belong to any Timeshare Cancellation, Exit, Release Firms consortiums or similar organizations and will never direct you away from TimeshareReleaseNOW.com.

Email fraud

Fraudulent email activity is increasing. These emails may appear to be from legitimate companies that you do business with – such as your bank, an online auction site, or your Internet service provider. You are often asked to validate or confirm your personal information by sending a reply, clicking on a link, or opening an attachment. These messages can contain viruses designed to record your keystrokes. These emails can also direct you to counterfeit websites that appear to be genuine.

If you suspect that an email that appears to be from TimeshareReleaseNOW.com is not legitimate, please call our telephone support team.

The Ultimate Guide to Write a Timeshare Cancellation Letter

The introduction of Consumer Protection has given the world an easy, convenient way to perform financial transactions knowing they have buyers protection from the scammers. Long gone are the days when you write a check, address an envelope, place a stamp on it, and drop it in the mail box. Still, there are people who fear the pitfalls of online transactions. It seems that most of those people are from the older generation who lack an understanding about the security online transactions can provide. The truth is never use a check when making payments with companies such these Timeshare Cancellation and Timeshare Exit Companies who will charge you and pull the phone out from the wall so you can never reach them again. Once they have the check payment, which is just as good as cash, they won, and their off with your money and there is nothing you can do about it. We will protect you from scams like this in the future, contact us to find out how we can monitor your finances today.

Timeshare Release Now vs other Timeshare Exit Companies

Owning a timeshare can end up being a huge regret. If you purchased a timeshare that you don’t want anymore, you need to know how to get rid of a timeshare. Between maintenance fees and high monthly payments, you can’t afford to keep your timeshare. Read on to learn the benefits of timeshare cancellation and figure out how to get rid of a timeshare, for good!

You came back from vacation this year with some cheap trinkets for the kids, a sunburn, and a timeshare. While a sunburn can be painful, the worst souvenir you brought with you was a timeshare. You never thought that you would fall for a timeshare scam, but here you are, making a monthly payment of a few hundred dollars plus an annual maintenance fee that can be upwards of a thousand bucks.

What do you get for your money? In many cases a whole lot of nothing. Between booking premiums and inflexible “flex” points, you may find that you can’t go on any vacation that peaks your interest. So you settle. Until you don’t want to settle anymore and then you start researching how to get rid of a timeshare.

One option is to try to sell your timeshare. During the presentation, the timeshare salesman convinced you that this would be easy. In fact, you may even make a little extra cash by selling your timeshare. I am sorry to be the one to break it to you, but neither of these are true. Selling a timeshare is difficult. The retail market for used timeshares is almost non-existent, and even if you can find a buyer, your timeshare is most likely worth only a fraction of what you paid for it.

Of course, there are some cases when selling is the answer to how to get rid of a timeshare. Timeshares that are at in-demand resorts who sell limited quantities can sell for a significant chunk of money. In fact, recently a timeshare at a resort in Maui sold for $150,000. But, this is a luxury resort in Maui, not a second rate timeshare from a hotel in Scottsdale or somewhere in Florida.

Most timeshares end up being sold for a fraction of what was paid for them. The average price for a second-hand timeshare sale is $7,000. So, if you bought your timeshare for around $30,000 (the average price), you are losing over twenty thousand dollars. As you can see, selling a timeshare may not be the best option for you.

Another way to get rid of a timeshare is to gift it to a friend or family member. If you know someone who wants a timeshare, this can be a great idea. They take over your monthly payments, and you don’t lose any more money. The downside here is that it can hard to even give a timeshare away.

Whoever you gift it to has to actually want a timeshare and be able to take over monthly payments and the yearly maintenance fee. All in all, a timeshare is a very expensive gift that not many people want. In fact, according to the AARP, the majority of people surveyed would reject a timeshare gift.

So, you sure as heck can’t sell your timeshare and now you can’t even give it away. You may feel the situation is hopeless and you won’t be able to figure out how to get rid of a timeshare.

It is not hopeless. With the help of our timeshare exit team, you can do a timeshare cancellation. This will get you out of your timeshare without any additional timeshare exit cost. You will be able to legally stop making your timeshare payments without having to find someone to take them over for you. With a timeshare cancellation, you walk away from your timeshare, free and clear.

Our timeshare exit team cost is reasonable, and we can get rid of your timeshare. We review your contract and then get to work. Once you enlist our help, you don’t have to talk to the timeshare company anymore, we do it all for you.

We create a resort authorized cancellation letter that is guaranteed to get rid of your timeshare. If we can’t cancel your timeshare for any reason, you get your money back. We are not at timeshare resale scam, and we do not work for the resort industry, we work for you.

Here at Timeshare Cancel Center, we are the real deal, and we can get you a timeshare cancellation. Call us today to learn more and to get a free timeshare exit team review of your timeshare contract.

To Receive More Information About “How to cancel a Timeshare

Executing a Timeshare Exit and need it done by the professionals call or Visit Our Website:

www.TimeshareReleaseNOW.com

For A Free Timeshare Release Now Team Consultancy Conducted By A Certified Timeshare Cancellation Specialist Call 24/7: 1-844-215-2744

Timeshare Release Now Resource Help website photo

A timeshare (sometimes called vacation ownership) is a property with a particular form of ownership or use rights. These properties are typically resort condominium units, in which multiple parties hold rights to use the property, and each sharer is allotted a period of time (typically one week and almost always the same time every year) in which they may use the property. Units may be on a partial ownership, lease, or “right to use” basis, in which the sharer holds no claim to ownership of the property.

There are many different types of Timeshare vacation ownership products available on the market today, but these can be divided into three main categories:

  • Traditional timeshare ownership
  • Fractional ownership
  • Points-based ownership

Traditional timeshare ownership refers to the purchase of an interval of usage at a single resort. Ownership is usually tied to a particular unit or unit type (one, two, three bedroom) and falls within a set week or within a season (a specific time of year or range of weeks when the owner can use his/her timeshare).

Fractional ownership refers to the purchase of a much larger increment of time (usually a set block of weeks) and is a good for travelers who are able to vacation for more than one or two weeks a year. Some top brands features on our website such as Ritz-Carlton offer fractional ownership. Fractional properties tend to be even more luxurious than traditional timeshares.

Points-based ownership (also often called vacation club memberships) refer to a system in which owners are allotted a specific number of points per year which can then be exchanged for accommodations at a variety of in-network resorts. Points function much like traditional timeshares in that they are often tied to a specific usage season, however they offer the added flexibility of being able to book shorter stays in larger units (or vice versa).

Each of these types of ownership products can be either fee-simple or right-to-use. Fee simple refers to a deeded purchase in which you own the timeshare perpetually, whereas right-to-use refers to a lease-like agreement in which your ownership expires after a set number of years. If you would like to learn more about timeshares and the types of ownership available, please visit our timeshare resale FAQ page.

Whether you hold a deeded interest, or you have a “right-to-use” contract, your ability to utilize your vacation ownership at your convenience is of paramount importance. After all, you’ve made a significant initial investment in a vacation product for the purpose of using and enjoying said product reliably, on a regular basis, right?

Otherwise, you could have simply visited a travel site on the web, like Expedia and/or Travelocity, and booked your next vacation with relative ease. If you are willing to pay via a credit card, and pony up the cost of your stay upfront, then you are offered numerous accommodation choices and, perhaps more importantly, near instantaneous availability – no wait, no muss, no fuss, and you’re practically out the door. It’s fair to state that in the not-too-distant past, near-instant availability was not as important a factor, as you knew maybe up to a year in advance when you could vacation with your entire family. However, we live in a different, much faster paced world today, with far more travel options than in those pre-internet days. Whole family vacations are still important to many of us, but adventure-based and theme-based vacations have quickly grown in popularity, too. Maybe the plan now is to have your parents watch the kids while you go skiing, scuba diving, sailing, hiking, etc. Or, maybe a travel window opens up unexpectedly, providing a last minute opportunity for a getaway with the kids – a less crowded family retreat with minimal missed school time, over a long holiday weekend, perhaps.

The point is that flexibility in planning your vacation can greatly increase your travel options and possibilities. So, how flexible is that timeshare vacation plan in which you have an ownership stake? Will your timeshare developer recognize your investment, both in upfront costs and annual maintenance fees, and bend over backwards to get you quickly on your way with minimal wait and/or aggravation?

Not so much, I’m afraid.

The reality is that there is virtually zero certainty you will obtain your resort of choice, particularly if you seek to take advantage of a last-minute vacation opportunity. The very best that can be said about booking your timeshare is that the further out you book, the better your chances are. However, in almost no event can you be certain of success, even if you attempt to reserve your resort and unit of choice up to one full year in advance.

Is this even legal, you may inquire? After all, isn’t this why I bought an ownership stake in a resort, so I’d have some reasonable degree of certainty I can go on vacation where and when I choose?

To the legality question: you are legally bound by what you agreed to in writing, as contained within your purchase documents. If you’re like a majority of timeshare buyers over the past half dozen or so years, then you most likely experienced a sales “bait and switch,” wherein the “deed” that was presented to you during the sales presentation was switched out at the point of sale with a product offering only limited use rights and containing contractual language that requires you to rely solely on the resort’s reservation system, rendering your future vacation plans “subject to availability.” You’ve also agreed, unwittingly, in your purchase documents, to abide by the rules relating to use of the reservation system, which may be modified or amended from time to time at the sole discretion of the resort! Typically, the sales process commences with the buyer being presented with a deed and ends with the deed going back to the resort in exchange for a product presumably of equal value. I’ll leave it to you, reader, to decide if what you ended up with, assuming you’re a recent timeshare buyer, is what you thought you were buying. At least with a deeded interest you’d presumably have an argument that you ought to be able to stay at “your” property when it suited you to do so! As it stands, your vacation ownership amounts to nothing more than an opportunity to try to reserve your interest, subject to availability – a far cry, I assume, from what you thought you were buying!

Well, ok, so let’s try to look at the brighter side of things. The developer is good sized, offering several resort locations, right? So, maybe you won’t get your location of first choice, but you should still be able to vacation at one of the other resorts in the chain within the same time frame? Why not give the reservation system a try, and see what you can obtain during your vacation window? Before going online or contacting the resort, let’s review what we know. You’ll recall that your timeshare contract allows for the possibility of rule changes without notification, so you don’t know what you may encounter. You just reach out however, because, regardless of how the rules may change, you know you can reserve “subject to availability”.

As I’ve stated before in other articles, the devil is in the details when it comes to timeshare! Since Timeshare Release Now, LLC spends innumerable hours delving into details, I can officially report a “devil” hiding in plain sight at the reservation center. As previously indicated, you are by now aware that making a reservation is subject both to internal rules and to “availability.” However, you are likely assuming at this point that your competition for your resort room is limited to only your fellow owners, and that the definition of availability means similarly situated persons, i.e. owners seeking access to their units contemporaneously. Given the assumption that only owners are in it, the line for units would presumably be relatively short.

Consider the possibility, however, that resort management has a different definition of “availability.” What if their definition includes a much broader class of persons than just similarly-situated owners? What if owners had no priority, or even less priority than other groups, and were instead competing with the general public for their stay?

Assume for a moment, if you will, that the following line of thought more accurately reflects the resort developers’ position: What if owners could be “trained” to anticipate little to no availability in the immediate future, and instead be encouraged to seek a reservation more than a year in advance to ensure a booking? That premise alone would discourage many owners from ever booking, due to the sheer difficulty of planning a trip that far out.

Worse yet, when ultimately they do arrive, owners will be denied the best amenities, providing the onsite sales team with an opportunity to peddle an upgrade that promises a more perfect vacation experience. This system enables and encourages developers to keep resort occupancy low in order to take advantage of vacationers who visit their website, or a travel site, in hopes of finding a last minute deal. In fact, developers are certain they can offer them a very good deal as they have ensured the resort maintenance costs are borne by existing owners, allowing the developer to offer an extremely favorable price to non-owners. This tactic further benefits the onsite sales force, as they are provided a constant stream of potential timeshare buyers against whom they may ply their trade.

Farfetched? Perhaps so. However, if you adjust your definition of availability to encompass and include non-owners as well as owners, and even tip the scales a bit in favor of non-owners due to the arguably greater economic opportunity gained in attracting them, then perhaps not! Indeed, unless your purchase documents contain a strict definition of the term “availability,” the application of a reservation system will be solely within the discretion of resort management. Available to whom and when, exactly? That question doesn’t get asked or answered in many timeshare/vacation ownership sales presentations.

Here at Timeshare Release Now, LLC, we are asking those questions via discovery demands to some of the resorts that we are currently in litigation with. We’ve yet to obtain concrete answers to those questions, but will report more here, via our website, when we do. In the interim, it’s an issue that needs to be brought up by the consumer and aired out at the time of purchase, and, if not then, then at the time you intend to book. Do you have a provided written copy of the reservation rules? If so, do you know if they’ve been revised or modified?

Although we don’t have all of the facts yet to report, I can advise that a number of our clients have gone online as members of the public without revealing their vacation ownership status and found availability at their respective resort for the period they were trying to book, even after being told (as owners) that there was no availability at that time. No availability for the owner perhaps, but if you’re a vacationer who may be a prospective timeshare buyer, that definition of availability may be a different definition altogether!

The examples expressed in this article are merely theoretical at this time, but they are quite plausible given our experience, and those of our clients, in this industry. As always, and particularly in the timeshare industry, the prevailing rule is caveat emptor: “let the buyer beware!”

Respectfully submitted,
Dustin Michaels, Case Manager

Timeshare Fraud Prevention from Timeshare Exit Companies

Regular readers of our blog are probably familiar with ARDA, or the American Resort Developers Association, the political voice and lobbying arm of the timeshare industry.

Earlier this spring, ARDA held its regular ARDA World conference, the largest gathering of timeshare developers in the world. Jeff Weir, timeshare expert and chief correspondent for RedWeek, was able to attend this enormous soiree in person, as he recently detailed in an “Ask RedWeek” column.

We think it’s important to highlight some of the findings that Weir took away from this massive networking and educational event. In particular, we found our attention piqued by Weir’s account of one educational panel, dubbed “The Effects of Buyer Regret on Rescission: Recognizing, Revealing and Rectifying Regret,” which was led by Dr. Amy Gregory, an assistant professor at the University of Central Florida Rosen College of Hospitality Management, whose research focuses on “Vacation Ownership, Revenue Management, and Conjoint Analysis,” according to her website, Timeshare Education.

Dr. Gregory’s findings are staggering. Let’s look at some of the ones that Weir highlights:

  • The average rescission rate is 15% – essentially identical to the daily average percentage of people who buy a timeshare following a sales presentation
  • 85% of all buyers regret their purchase, citing reasons including money, fear, confusion, intimidation, and distrust
  • 41% of buyers never thought they would regret their purchase, but ended up doing so; 30% were neutral prior to buying, but came to regret their decision
  • 95% of all buyers go back to their resort and sales team for more information after the sale, usually within one to three days, seeking more information about maintenance fees, resale options, and pricing alternatives

In an interview with Weir after her presentation, Dr. Gregory also expanded on some important “regret-and-remorse” factors that drive timeshare buyers toward rescission. First, she cites the “price tag” as a big factor that inspires remorse, which is particularly telling when you consider that, according to research presented at this year’s ARDA World, the average price of a new timeshare is $20,040. Dr. Gregory also suggests that “intervening factors” play a huge role in persuading customers to cancel a purchase; in the case of timeshares, these factors include “negative feedback from a friend, finding conflicting information about timeshares on the Internet, frustration navigating company websites, or mixed messages from other sales personnel.”

Broadly speaking, Dr. Gregory’s findings provide concrete examples for what those of us who work with the timeshare industry have long known. Her information, for instance, reaffirms our belief that timeshare sales presentations, while effective at securing a closing, do not provide all of the information that a consumer really needs to make a confident, educated purchasing decision. Her research, too, singles out many of the same factors that our clients have come to us complaining about, including daunting maintenance fees and the anemic nature of the secondary market.

And, finally, Dr. Gregory’s report confirms our belief that the industry’s culture of unfriendly consumer practices will ultimately only result in the timeshare business “eating its young.” As Weir points out, getting a handle on “regret-and-remorse” could greatly benefit the developers themselves, who are losing value with each cancelled sale; as he notes, “if the industry reaches $10 billion in annual sales, that means an additional $1.5 billion in sales were cancelled.”

And don’t forget the consumer! Adopting a more open, forthright, and affordable approach to every aspect of the timeshare purchasing process will benefit buyers as well. As Dr. Gregory tells Weir, “from a buyer’s perspective, it will be a positive outcome if we can alleviate some of their regret at time of purchase.”

For more fascinating findings from the ARDA World event, we encourage you to read Mr. Weir’s full article for RedWeek here.

Have any questions or concerns? Led by Advocate Dustin Michaels and associates with 25 years of experience, Timeshare Release Now is a consumer protection firm specializing in timeshare contract relief and Timeshare Counseling. Our lawyers & Advocacy Team understand vacation ownerships as well as the many pitfalls of the secondary market of timeshare resales. If you feel you have been victimized by a timeshare company, contact our offices for a free consultation. Know your rights as a consumer and don’t hesitate to drop us a line with any questions or concerns.


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